The Coleman Lineage

Descendants of Milesius

The following is the Coleman lineage from Milesius, father of the Irish race, to Fiachra, who was the ancestor of the Uí Fiachrach. Most Irish can trace their ancestry to the Sons of Milesisus. This is taken from Part Ill, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9. The numbers are the generations from Adam, according to O'Hart, which are in turn based on the Annals of the Four Masters. Generations l-36 are available in the Descendants of Adam.


Heremon was the seventh son of Milesius of Spain (who is No. 36), but the third of the three sons who was left any issue. From him were descended the Kings, Nobility, and Gentry of the Kingdoms of Connacht, Dalriada, Leinster, Meath, Orgiall, Ossory; of Scotland since the fifth century; and of Ulster since the fourth century. THE STEM OF THE "LINE OF HEREMON"ORThe Stem of the Irish Nation from Heremon down to (No.124) Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin, Monarch of Ireland in fourth century, who was the ancestor of Columhán, Colmáin 6th Century, O'Colmáin 11th Century, anglicised Coleman 18th Century.

Milesius of Spain.
Heremon: his son. He and his eldest brother Heber were, jointly, the first. Milesian Monarchs of Ireland; they began to reign, A.M. 3,500, or, Before Christ, 1699. After Heber was slain, B.C. 1698, Heremon reigned singly for fourteen years; during which time a certain colony called by the Irish Cruithneaigh, in English "Cruthneans" or Picts, arrived in Ireland and requested Heremon to assign them a part of the country to settle in, which he refused; but, giving them as wives the widows of the Tuatha de-Danans, slain in battle, he sent them with a strong party of his own forces to conquer the country then called "Alba," but now Scotland; conditionally, that they and their posterity should be tributary to the Monarchs of Ireland. Heremon died, B.C. 1683, and was succeeded by three of his four sons, named Muimne,"The House of Hereman," Luigne, and Laighean, who reigned jointly for three years, and were slain by their Heberian successors.
lrial Faidh (" faidh": Irish, a prophet): his son; was the 10th Monarch of Ireland ; d. B.C. 1670. This was a very learned King; could foretell things to come; and caused much of the country to be cleared of the ancient forests. He likewise built seven royal palaces, viz., Rath Ciombaoith, Rath Coincheada, Rath Mothuig, Rath Buirioch, Rath Luachat, Rath Croicne, and Rath Boachoill. He won four remarkable battles over his enemies: - Ard lnmath, at Teabtha, where Stirne, the son of Dubh, son of Fomhar, was slain; the second battle was at Teanmhuighe, against the Fomhoraice, where Eichtghe, their leader, was slain; the third was the battle of Loch Muighe, where Lugrot, the son of Moghfeibhis, was slain and the fourth was the battle of Cuill Martho, where the four sons of Heber were defeated. lrial died in the second year after this battle, having reigned 10 years, and was buried at Magh Muagh.
Eithrial: his son; was the 11th Monarch; reigned 20 years, and was slain by Conmaol, the son of Heber Fionn, at the battle of Soirrean, in Leinster, B.C. 1650. This also was a learned King. He wrote with his own hand the History of the Gaels (or Gadelians); in his reign seven large woods were cleared, and much advance made in the practice of agriculture.
Foil-Aich: his son ; was kept out of the Monarchy by Conmaol, the slayer of his father, who usurped his place.
Tigernmas : his son; was the 13th Monarch, and reigned 77 years; according to Keating,he reigned but 50 years; he fought twenty-seven battles with the followers of the family of Heber Fionn, all which he gained. In his reign gold was mined near the Liffey, and skilfully worked by lnchadhan. This King also made a law that each grade of society should be known by the number of colours in its wearing apparel: - the clothes of a slave should be of one colour; those of a soldier of two; the dress of a commanding officer to be of three colours; a gentleman's dress, who kept a table for the free entertainment of strangers, to be of four colours ; five colours to be allowed to the nobility (the chiefs); and the King, Queen, and Royal Family, as well as the Druids, historians, and other learned men to wear six colours.
This King died, B.C. 1513, on the Eve of lst of November, with two-thirds of the pie of Ireland, at Magh Sleaght (or Field of Adoration), in the county of Leitrim, as he was adoring the Sun-God, Crom Cruach (a quo Macrom).
Historians say this Monarch was the first who introduced image worship in Ireland.
Enboath: his son, It was in this prince's lifetime that the Kingdom was divided in two parts by a line drawn from Drogheda to Limerick.


Smiomghail: his son; in his lifetime the Picts in Scotland were forced to abide by their oath, and pay homage to the Irish Monarch; seven large woods were also cut down.
Fiacha Labhrainn: his son; was the 18th Monarch; reigned 24 years; slew Eochaidh Faobharglas, of the line of Heber, at the battle of Carman. During his reign all the inhabitants of Scotland were brought in subjection to the Irish Monarchy, and the conquest was secured by his son the 20th Monarch. Fiacha at length (B.C. 1448) fell in the battle of Bealgadain, by the hands of Eochaidh Mumho, the son of Moefeibhis, of the race of Heber Fionn.
Aongus Olmucach: his son; was the 20th Monarch ; in his reign, the Picts again refused to pay the tribute imposed on them 250 years before, by Heremon, but this Monarch went with a strong army into Alba and in thirty pitched battles overcame them and forced them to pay the required tribute.
Aongus was at length slain by Eana, in the battle of Carman, B.C. 1409.
Main: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by Eadna, of the line of Heber Fionn. In his time silve
shields were given as rewards for bravery to the Irish militia.
Rotheachtach: his son; was the 22nd Monarch; slain, B.C. 1357, by Sedne (or Seadhna), of the line of Ir.
Dein: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by his father's slayer, and his son. In his time gentlemen
and noblemen first wore gold chains round their necks, as a sign of their birth ; and golden helmets
were given to brave soldiers.
Siorna "Saoghalach" (longaevus): his son; was the 34th Monarch; he obtained the name "Saoghalach"
on account of his extraordinary long life; slain, B.C 1030, at Aillin, by Rotheachta, of the Line of
Heber Fionn, who usurped the Monarchy, thereby excluding from the thron.
Olioll Aoicheoin: son of Siorna Saoghalach/
Gialchadh : his son ; was the 37th Monarch; killed by Art Imleach, of the Line of Heber Fionn, at Moighe Muadh, B.C. 1013.
Nuadbas Fionnfail : his son; was the 39th Monarch; slain by Breasrioghacta, his successor, B.C. 961.
Aedan Glas: his son. In his time the coast was infested with pirates ; and there occurred a dreadful plague (Apthach) which swept away most of the inhabitants.
Simeon Breac: his son; was the 44th Monarch; he inhumanly caused his predecessor to be torn asunder; but, after a reign of six years, he met with a like death, by order of Duach Fionn, son to the murdered King, B.C. 903.
Muredach Bolgach: his son; was the 46th Monarch; killed by Eadhua Dearg, B.C 892-, be bad two sons - Duach Teamhrach, and Fiacha.
Flacha Tolgrach : son of Muredach; was the 55th Monarch. His brother Duach had two sons, Eochaidh Framhuine and Conang Beag-eaglach, who were the 51st and 53rd Monarchs of Ireland. Fiachi's life was ended by the sword of Oilioll Fionn, of the Line of Heber Fionn, B.C. 795.
Duach Ladbrach: his son; was the 59th Monarch ; killed by Lughaidh Laighe, son of Oilioll Fionn, B.C. 737.
Eochaidh Buadhach: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by his father's slayer. In his time the kingdom was twice visited with a plague.
Ugaine-Mór: his son. This Ugaine, (or Hugony) the Great was the 66th Monarch of Ireland. Was called Mór on account of his extensive dominions, - being sovereign of all the Islands of Western Europe. Was married to Caesair, dau. to the King of France, and by her had issue-twenty-two sons and three daughters. In order to prevent these children encroaching on each other he divided the Kingdom into twenty-five portions, allotting to each his (or her) distinct inheritance. By means of this division the taxes of the country were collected during the succeeding 300 years. All the sons died without issue except two, viz: - laeghaire Lorc, ancestor of all the Leinster Heremonians; and Cobthach Caoibhreagh, from whom the Heremonians of Leath Cuinn, viz., Meath, Ulster, and Conacht derive their pedigree. Ugaine was at length, B.C. 593, stain by Badhbhchadh, who failed to secure the fruits of his murder - the Irish Throne, as he was executed by order of Laeghaire Lorc, the murdered Monarch's son, who became the 68th Monarch.
Colethach Caol-bhreagh: son of Ugaine M6r; was the 69th Monarch ; it is said, that, to secure the Throne, he assassinated his brother Laeghaire; after a long reign he was at length stain by Maion, his nephew, B.C. 541.
Melg Moibhthach: his son; was the7Ist Monarch; was stain by Modhchorb, son of Cobhthach Caomh, of the Line of Haber Fionn, B. C. 541.
laran Gleofathach : his son was the 74th Monarch ; was a King of great justice and wisdom very well teamed and possessed of many accomplishments; stain by FearChorb, son of Modh-Chorb, B.C. 473.
Conia Caomh: his son; was the 76th Monarch of Ireland; died a natural death, B.C. 412.
Olioll Cas-fiachlach : his son; was the 77th Monarch; slain by his successor, Adhamhar Foitchaion, B.c. 417.
Eochaidh Alt-Leathan: his son; was the 79th Monarch; slain by Feargas Fortamhail, his successor, B.C. 395. ,
Aongus (or Æneas) Tuiryneach-Teamrach: his son; was the 81st Monarch; his son, Fiacha Firmara (so called from being exposed in a small boat on the sea) was ancestor of the Kings of Dairiada, and Argyle in Scotland. This Aongus was slain at Tara (Teamhrach), B.C. 324.
Enna Aigneach: the legitimate son of Aongus; was the 84th Monarch; was of a very bountiful disposition, and exceedingly munificent in his donations. This King lost his life by the hands of Criomthan Cosgrach, B.C. 292.
Assaman Eamhna: his son; was excluded from the Throne by his father's murderer.
Roighen Ruadh: his son ; in his time most of the cattle in Ireland died of murrain.
Fionnlogh: his son.
Flonn: his son; m. Benia, dau. of Criomthan; had two sons.
Eochaidh Feidlioch: his son; was the 93rd Monarch; m. Clothfionn, dau. of Eochaidh Uchtleathan, who was a very virtuous lady. By him she had three children at a birth - Breas, Nar, and Lothar (the Fineamhis), who were slain at the battle of Dromchriadh ; after their death, a melancholy settled on the Monarch, hence his name "Feidhlioch." This Monarch caused the division of the Kingdom by Ugaine M6r into twenty-five parts, to cease; and ordered that the ancient Firvolgian division into Provinces should be resumed, viz., Two Munsters, Leinster, Conacht and Ulster. He also divided the government of these Provinces amongst his favourite courtiers: - Conacht he divided into three parts between Fiodhach, Echaidh Allat, and Tinne, son of Conragh, son of Ruadhd M6r, No 62 on the "Line of lr;" Ulster (Uladh) he gave to Feargus, the son of Leighe; Leinster he gave to Res, the son of Feargus Fairge ; and the two Munsters he gave to Tighernach Teadhbheamach and Deagbadah. After this division of the Kingdom, Eochaidh proceeded to erect a Royal Palace in Conacht; this he built on Tinne's government in a place called Druin-na-n Druagh, now Craughan (from Craughan Crodhearg, Maedhbh's mother, to whom she gave the palace), but previously, Rath Eochaidh. About the same time he bestowed his daughter the Princess Maedhbh on Tinne, whom be constituted King of Conacht ; Maedhbh being hereditary Queen of that Province. After many years reign Tinne was slain by Maceacht (or Monaire) at Tara. After ten years' undivided reign, Queen Maedhbh married Oilioll M6r, son of Ros Ruadh, of Leinster, to whom she bore the seven Maine; Oilioll M6r was at length slain by Conall Cearnach, who was soon after killed by the people of Conacht. Maedhbh was at length slain by Ferbhuidhe, the son of Conor MacNeasa (Neasa was his mother); but in reality this Conor was the son of Fachtna Fathach, son of Cas, son of Ruadhri M6r, of the Line of lr. This Monarch, Eochaidh, died at Tara, B.C. 130.
Bress Nar-Lothar- his son. In his time the Irish first dug graves beneath the surface to bury their dead; previously they laid the body on the surface and heaped stones over it. He had also been named Fineamhnas.
Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg: his son; was the 98th Monarch ; he entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark, whose daughter, Dearborguill, he obtained as his wife ; he killed himself by failing on his sword. in the eighth year Before CHRIST.
Crimthann-Niadh-Nar: his son ; who was the 100th 'Monarch of Ireland, and styled "The Heroic." It was in this Monarch's reign that our Lord and Saviour JESUS CHRIST was born. Crimthann's death was occasioned by a fall from his horse, B.C. 9. Was married to Nar-Tath-Chaoch, dau. of Laoch, son of Daire, who lived in the land of the Picts (Scotland).
Feredach Fionn-Feachtnach : his son; was the 102nd Monarch. The epithet "feachtnach" was applied to this Monarch because of his truth and sincerity. In his reign lived Moran, the son of Maoin, a celebrated Brehon, or Chief Justice of the Kingdom; it is said that he was the first who wore the wonderful collar called lodhain Morain; this collar possessed a wonderful property: -if the judge who wore it attempted to pass a false judgment it would immediately contract, so as nearly to stop his breathing; but if he reversed such false sentence the collar would at once enlarge itself, and hang loose around his neck. This collar was also caused to be worn by those who acted as witnesses, so as to test the accuracy of their evidence. This Monarch, Feredach, died a natural death at the regal city at Tara, A.D. 36.
Fiacha Fionn Ola: his son; was the 104th Monarch; reigned 17 years, and was (A.D. 56)
slain by Eiliomh MacConrach, of the Race if lr, who succeeded him on the throne. This Fiacha was married to Eithne, daughter of the King of Alba; whither, being near her confinement at the death of her husband, she went, and was there delivered of a son, who was named Tuathal.
Tuathal Teachtmar: that son; was the 106th Monarch of Ireland. When Tuathal came of age, he got together his friends, and, with what aid his grandfather the king of Alba gave him, came into Ireland and fought and overcame his enemies in twenty-five battles in Ulster, twenty-five in Leinster, as many in Connaught, and thirty-five in Munster. And having thus restored the true royal blood and heirs to their respective provincial kingdoms, he thought fit to take, as he accordingly did with their consent, from each of the four divisions or provinces of Munster, Leinster, Connaught, and Ulster, a considerable tract of ground which was the next adjoining to Uisneach (where Tuathal had a palace): one east, another west, a third south, and a fourth on the north of it; and appointed all four (tracts of ground so taken from the four provinces) under the name of Midhe or "Meath" to belong for ever after to the Monarch's own peculiar demesne for the maintenance of his table; on each of which several portions he built a royal palace for himself and his heirs and successors; for every of which portions the Monarch ordained a certain chiefry or tribute to be yearly paid to the provincial Kings from whose provinces the said portions were taken, which may be seen at large in the Chronicles. It was this Monarch that imposed the great and insupportable fine (or "Eric') of 6,000 cows or beeves, as many fat muttons, (as many) bogs, 6,000 mantles, 6,000 ounces (or 'Uinge') of silver, and 12,000 (others have it 6,000) cauldrons or pots of brass, to be paid every second year by the province of Leinster to the Monarchs of Ireland for ever, for the death of his only two daughters Fithir and Darina. This tribute was punctually taken and exacted, sometimes by fire and sword, during the reigns of forty Monarchs of Ireland upwards of six hundred years, until at last remitted by Finachta Fleadhach, the 153rd Monarch of Ireland, and the 26th Christian Monarch, at the request and earnest solicitation of St. Moling. At the end of thirty years' reign, the Monarch Tuathal was slain by his successor Mal, A.D. 106,
This Monarch erected Royal Palace at Tailtean ; around the grave of Queen Tailte he caused the Fairs to be resumed on La Lughnasa (Lewy's Day), to which were brought all of the youth of both sexes of a suitable age to be married, at which Fair the marriage articles were agreed upon, and the ceremony performed. Tuathal married Baine, the dau. of Sgaile Baibh, King of England.
Fedhlimidh (Felim) Rachtmar: his son; was so called as being a maker of excellent wholesome laws among which he established with all firmness that of "Retaliation;" kept to it inviolably; and by that means preserved the people in peace, quiet, plenty, and security during his time. This Felim was the 108th Monarch ; reigned nine years; and, after all his pomp and greatness, died of thirst, A.D. 119. He married Ughna, dau. of the King of Denmark.
Conn Ceadeathach (or Conn of the Hundred Battles ) ; his son ; This Conn was so called from hundreds of battles by him fought and won : viz., sixty battles against Cahir M6r, King of Leinster and the 109th Monarch of Ireland, whom he slew and succeeded in the Monarchy; one bundred battles against the Ulsterians ; and one hundred more in Munster against Owen M6r (or Mogha Nua-Dhad), their King, who, notwithstanding, forced the said Conn to an equal division of the Kingdom with him. He had two brothers - 1. Eochaidh Fionn-Fohart, 2. Fiacha Suidhe, who, to make way for themselves, murdered two of their brother's sons named Conla Ruadh and Crionna; but they were by the third son Art Eanfhear banished, first into Leinster, and then into Munster, where they lived near Cashel. They were seated at Deici Teamhrach (now the barony of Desee in Meath), whence they were expelled by the Monarch Cormac Ulfhada, son of Art; and, after various wanderings, they went to Munster where Oilioll Olum, who was married to Sadhbh, daughter of Conn of the Hundred Battles, gave them a large district of the present county of Waterford, a part of which is still called Na-Deiseacha, or the baronies of Desies. They were also given the country comprised in the present baronies of Clonmel, Upper-Third, and Middle-Third,in the Co.Tipperary, which they held till the Anglo-Norman Invasion. From Eochaidh Fionn-Fohart decended O'Nowlan or Nolan of Fowerty (or Foharta), in Lease (or Leix), and Saint Bridget; and from Fiacha Suidhe are O'Dolan, O'Brick of Dunbrick, and O'Faelan of Dun Faelan, near Cashel. Conn of the Hundred Battles had also three daughters: 1. Sadhbh, who m. first, MacNiadh, after whose death she m. Oilioll Olum, King of Munster. (See No. 84 on the "Line of Heber'); 2.Maoin; and 3.Sarah (or Sarad), m. to Conan MacMogha Laine. - (See No. 81 infra). Conn reigned 35 years; but was at length barbarously slain by Tiobraidhe Tireach, son of Mal, son of Rochruidhe, King of Ulster. This murder was committed in Tara, A.D. 157, when Conn chanced to be alone and unattended by his guards; the assassins were fifty ruffians, disguised as women, whom the King of Ulster employed for the purpose.
Art Eanfhear ("art:" Irish, a bear, a stone,. noble, great, generous, hardness, cruelty. "Ean:" Irish, one,. "fhear," "ar," the man; Gr. "Ar," The Man, or God of War): son of Conn of the Hundred Fights; a quo 0'h-Airt, anglicised O'Hart. This Art, who was the 112 Monarch of Ireland, had three sisters - one of whom Sarad was the wife of Conaire Mac Mogha Laine, the 111 Monarch, by whom she had three sons called the "Three Cairbres," viz.- 1. Cairbre (alias Eochaidh) Riada -a quo "Dalriada," in Ireland, and in Scotland; 2. Cairbre Bascaon; 3. Cairbre Musc, who was the ancestor of O'Falvey, lords of Corcaguiney, etc. Sabina (or Sadhbh), another sister, was the wife of MacNiadh (nia), half King of Munster (of the Sept of Lughaidh, son of lthe), by whom she had a son named Maccon; and by her second husband Oilioll Olum she had nine sons, seven whereof were slain by their half brother Maccon, in the famous battle of Magh Mucroimhe [muccrove], in the county of Galway, where also the Monarch Art himself fell, siding with his brother-in-iaw Oilioll Olum against the said Maccon, after a reigh of thirty years, A.D. 195. This Art was married to Maedhbh, Leathdearg, the dau. of Conann Cualann; from this Queen, Rath Maedhbhe, near Tara, obtained its name.
Cormac Ulfhada: son of Art Eanfhear; m. Eithne, dau. of Dunlang, King of Leinster; had three elder brothers- 1. Artghen, 2. Boindia, 3. Bonnrigh. He had also six sons- 1. Cairbre Lifeachar, 2. Muireadach, 3. Moghruith, 4. Ceallach, 5. Daire, 6. Aongus Fionn; Nos. 4 and 5 left no issue. King Cormac Mac Art was the 115th Monarch of Ireland; and was called "Ulfhada," because of his long beard. He was the wisest, most learned, and best of any of the Milesian race before him, that ruled the Kingdom. He ordained several good laws; wrote several learned treatises, among which his treatise on "Kingly Government," directed to his son Carbry liffechar, is extant and extraordinary. he was very magnificent in his housekeeping and attendants, having always one thousand one hundred and fifty persons in his daily retinue constantly attending at his Great Hall at Tara; which was three hundred feet long, thirty cubits high, and fifty cubits broad, with fourteen doors in it. His daily service of plate, flagons, drinking cups of gold, silver, and precious stone, at his table, ordinarily consisted of one hundred and fifty pieces, besides dishes, etc., which were all pure silver or gold. He ordained that ten choice persons should constantly attend him and his successors- Monarchs of Ireland, and never to be absent from him, viz.- 1. A nobleman to be his companion; 2. A judge to deliver and explain the laws of the country in the King's presence upon all occasions; 3. An antiquary or historiographer to declare and preserve the genealogies, acts, and occurrences of the nobility and gentry from time to time as occasion required; 4. A Druid or Magician to offer sacrifice, and presage good or bad omens, as his learning, skill, or knowledge would enable him; 5. A poet to praise or dispraise every one according to his good or bad actions; 6. A physician to administer physic to the king and queen, and to the rest of the (royal) family; 7. A musician to compose music, and sing pleasant sonnets in the King's presence when thereunto disposed; and 8, 9, and 10, three Stewards to govern the King's House in all things appertaining thereunto. This custom was observed by all the succeeding Monarchs down to Brian Boromha [Boru], the 175th Monarch of Ireland, and the 60th down from Cormac, without any alteration only that since they received the Christian Faith they changed the Druid or Magician for a Prelate of the Church. What is besides delivered from antiquity of this great monarch is, that (which among the truly wise is more valuable than any worldly magnificence or secular glory whatsoever) he was to all mankind very just, and so upright in his actions, judgments, and laws, that God revealed unto him the light of His Faith seven years before his death; and from thenceforward he refused his Druids to worship their idol-gods, and openly professed he would no more worship any but the true God of the Universe, the Immortal and Invisible King of Ages. Whereupon the Druids sought his destruction, which they soon after effected (God permitting it) by their adjurations and ministry of damned spirits choking him as he sat at dinner eating of salmon, some say by a bone of the fish sticking in his throat, A.D. 266 , after he had reigned forty years. Of the six sons of Cormac Mac Art, no issue is recorded from any [of them], but from Cairbre-Lifeachar: he had also ten daughters, but there is no account of any of them only two- namely, Grace (or Grania and Ailbh [alve], who were both successively the wives of the great champion and general of the Irish Militia, Fionn, the son of Cabhall [Coole]. The mother of Cormac MacArt was Eachtach, the dau. of Ulcheatagh.
Cormac was married to Eithne Oilamhdha, dau. of Duniang, son of Eana Niadh; she was fostered by Buiciodh Brughach, in Leinster.
Caibre-Lifeachar, 117th Monarch of Ireland; son of King Cormac Mac Art: was so called from his having been nursed by the side of the Liffey, the river on which Dublin is built. His mother was Eithne, daughter of Dunlong, King of Leinster. He had three sons- 1. Eochaidh Dubhlen., 2. Eocho; and 3. Fiacha Srabhteine, who Was the 120th Monarch of Ireland, and the ancestor of O'Neill, Princes of Tyrone. Fiacha Srabhteine was so called, from his having been fostered at Dunsrabhteine, in Connaught, of which province he was King, before his elevation to the Monarchy . After seventeen years' reign, the Monarch Cairbre Lifeachar was slain at the battle of Gabhra [Gaura), A.D. 284, by Simeon, the son of Ceirb, who came from the south of Leinster to this battle, fought by the Militia of Ireland, who were called the Fiana Erionn (or Fenians), and arising from a quarrel which happened between them; in which the Monarch, taking part with one side against the other, lost his life.
Fiacha Srabhteine. King of Conacht, and the 120th Monarch of Ireland: son of Cairbre-Lifeachar; married Aoife, dau. of the King of Gall Gaodhal. This Fiacha, after 37 years reign, was, in the battle of Dubhcomar, A.D. 322, slain by his nephews, the Three Collas, to make room fo Colla Uais, who seized on, and kept, the Monarchy for four years. From those three Collas the "Clan Colla" were so called.
Muireadach Tireach: son of Fiacha Srabhteine; m. Muirion, dau. of Fiachadh, King of Ulster; and having, in A.D. 326, fought and defeated Colla Uais, and banished him and his two brothers into Scotland, regained his father's Throne, which he kept as the 122nd Monarch for 30 years.
Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin [Moyvone): his son; was the 124th Monarch; and in the 8th year of reign died a natural death at Tara, A.D. 365; leaving issue four sons, viz., by his first wife Mong Fionn:- 1.Brian; 11. Fiachra; Ill. Olioll; IV. Fergus. And, by his second wife, Carthan Cais Dubh (or Cadona), daughter of the Celtic King of Britain,- V. Niall M6r, commonly called "Niall of the Nine Hostages." Mong Fionn was dau. of Fiodhach, and sister of Crimthann, King of Munster, of the Heberian Sept, and successor of Eochaidh in the Monarchy. This Crimthann was poisoned by his sister Mong Fionn, in hopes that Brian, her oldest son by Eochaidh, would succeed in the Monarchy. To avoid suspicion she herself drank of the same poisoned cup which she presented to her brother; but, notwithstanding that she lost her life by so doing, yet her expectations were not realised, for the said Brian and her other three sons by the said Eochaidh were laid aside (whether out of horror of the mother's inhumanity in poisoning her brother, or otherwise, is not known), and the youngest son of Eochaidh, by Carthan Cais Dubh, was preferred to the Monarchy. 1. Brian, from him were descended the Kings, nobility and gentry of Conacht - Tirloch M6r O'Connor, the 121st, and Roderic O'Connor, the 183rd Monarch of Ireland. 11. Fiachra's descendants gave their name to Tir-Fiachra ("Tireragh"), co. Sligo, and possessed also parts of Co, Mayo. Ill.Olioll's descendants settled in Sligo- in Tir Oliolla (or Tirerill).' This Fiachra had five sons:- 1. Earc Cuilbhuide; 2.Breasal; 3. Conaire; 4. Feredach (or Dathi); and 5. Amhalgaidh.

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